Snowdon

Mount Snowdon is situated in the Snowdonia National Park, covering an area of 840 square miles. The area around Snowdon is very mountainous. The views all around the region are good and there are some picturesque villages.

The main recommended route is situated in the pass of Llanberis where it meets with Pen-y-Pass. There is a youth hostel here and a mountain rescue post. There are 2 starts, either the Pyg Track or the Miners Track.

The town of Llanberis is 6 miles away on the shore of Llyn Padarn or Llanberis Lake. Along the shore of this lake is a steam railway, which is open to visitors. Probably the most famous tourist attraction in this area is the Snowdon Mountain Railway. This line starts in Llanberis and continues to the summit of Snowdon. 

On the summit there is a café and gift shop, where thirsty walkers can quench their thirst and purchase souvenirs. Some walkers prefer to travel one way on the railway and the other on foot.



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Ben Nevis

Fort William is the main town near the foothills of Ben Nevis. It also represents the start or end of the Caledonian Canal, which runs to Inverness on the east coast. The West Highland Way ends here and The Great Glen Way starts here. The area is a walker’s paradise. Glen Nevis Visitor Centre provides interesting displays of local attractions as well as general information about the area including Ben Nevis.

Many of the buildings in Fort William are stone built and the town is clean and pleasant. The local people are keen to welcome visitors and there are numerous hostelries in which to sample local ale. There are several outdoor shops in the town centre. Over recent years the area has become a set for film producers with films like Braveheart, Harry Potter and Highlander being filmed here. Travelling to Fort William by car will give some of the best views anywhere in the U.K. particularly travelling through Glen Coe. There is  also a rail and bus link to the town.

The road along Glen Nevis runs for approximately 7miles. You will find the Visitor Centre, the Glen Nevis Caravan & Camping Park and the youth hostel along this road.



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Scafell Pike

Scafell Pike is bordered by Wastwater on the south western side of the Lake District and Derwent Water to the north. The nearest main towns are situated several miles away, Keswick, Cockermouth and Ambleside are all within easy reach by car. Scafell Pike is in the heart of the largest national park in England, which has 16 lakes within its area. The National Trust owns much of the area. 

When ascending Scafell Pike via the Corridor Route, ample parking can be found in Seathwaite. You arrive there by passing Grange at the southern end of Derwent Water. There is a café at Seathwaite and a trout farm. 

Approaching Scafell foothills from Wastwater there is a small car park on the left and a large National Trust car park (charge) over the small bridge on your right near a campsite at the northern end of the lake. Here the walk begins.



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Introduction

“One of the ultimate challenges in the United Kingdom” is how many people describe this 3 peaks walk. Ben Nevis at 1344m, Scafell Pike at 978m and Snowdon at 1085m. The challenge of climbing the 3 highest mountains in Great Britain appeals to many walkers.

The National 3 Peaks of Scotland, England and Wales consist of 26 miles of ascents and descents. Weather conditions can play a big part in deciding if you can complete the walk safely. Snow, low cloud or darkness can also be deciding factors, so you need to make careful preparations, looking at the weather forecasts and the equipment that will be used for the venture.

The path to the summit of Ben Nevis was originally built as a pony track to service the observatory and the hotel, which are now in ruins. The observatory was operational between 1883-1904. Surprisingly there have been a number of cars that have actually driven to the summit, no doubt with a lot of help.

The highest war memorial in Britain is also situated on this summit. The views from here are breathtaking in all directions.

This walk should ideally be attempted between May-Oct, the longest day being 21st June. Many people attempt the 3 peaks in June so you may well find car parks full and many other walkers around; therefore it is worth looking at other months like May, or July to September.

You can of course walk it at other times of the year with caution. It helps if you can walk during the week and not weekends, as car parks are more freely available with generally less congestion.

There are well-defined paths leading to the summits of Ben Nevis and Snowdon. Scafell Pike is slightly different, the paths are not so well defined in places, but care in planning the ascent will help you attain the summit and return safely.



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